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If there were ovations (as in the old times!) during Saturday night it means that the audience felt as excited as it had not for a long time. It was the result of the confluence –above almost all and together with the cast- of two singers, one of them local , who joins experience with professionalism in the highest level, as is the case of tenor Gustavo López Manzitti, who was able to deal with the difficulties throughout the ample protagonism that Werther has, either vocalic or of diction and style. Everything was exhibited with presence and intensity.

EJS / Opera desde hoy / April 19, 2015

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What can be said about Gustavo López Manzitti. It causes me much indignation to think that if it hadn’t been for the cancellation of Vargas we wouldn’t have been able to hear this memorable version of the role precisely in the hands of a local artist, with everything that having limited performing opportunities implies. We are used to López Manzitti being flawless in each and every role he performs, being a particularly versatile tenor who has sung roles of extremely varied styles and tessituras. But never before he had accomplished such an overwhelming performance as this one, where he vocally shone in a particularly demanding and tiring role, thanks to the reliability of his emission, the vocal volume, the extension which showed him in absolute command of his low and high tessitura and, on top of that, affording the luxury of doing a smorzando in the last act. And if all this wasn’t enough he rendered an touching Werther, profoundly connected with this character. He had moments of great impact. It has been a long time since a tenor hadn’t moved me up to tears in the end of Act I, when (Werther) grasps the fate that awaits him (“A ce serment… restez fidèle! Moi… j’en mourrai! Charlotte!”). His scene in the third act with Charlotte was of such an intensity by both performers that drove the performance to a halt, to Levin’s evident displeasure, because the audience exploded in a thunderous applause. The final scene with them both was truly heartbreaking. In sum, a memorable version, superbly achieved with excellent musical and staging direction, a high quality cast even in the smallest roles and two lead singers who would cause great excitement in any opera house in the world.

By Luis Baietti / Una voce poco fa / April 21, 2015

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Gustavo López Manzitti was a Bebe Dom of full-fledged voice, firm high notes and clear diction.

By Christian Walter Lauria / Opera World / October 29, 2013

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I have nothing but admiration for Gustavo López Manzitti, singing with stamina and perfect intonation the high tessitura of Bebe Dom.

By Pablo Bardin / The Buenos Aires Herald / November 16, 2013

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There were not surprises with Gustavo López Manzitti, who faces this role preceded by a generous and eclectic career in which he has sung practically everything of the most musical styles (and this month we are to see him in Rosario also doing Zarzuela) and always from high to superior performances. Even when it can be daring on my part I would say that this Werther is a consummation, a role in which he puts to work everything he’s got because the scores demands for it and where an impeccable vocal performance is joined to a complete drama made of emotional commitment to the character. A great performance.

By Luis Baietti / Opera y Ballet / August 6, 2012

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our tenor Gustavo López Manzitti (who had sung Gabriel Adorno in 2003) rose valiantly to the occasion, singing with intensity and fortitude.

By Pablo Bardin / The Buenos Aires Herald / August 18, 2011

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Gustavo López Manzitti pursued a flawless Gabriele Adorno; Manzitti is an outstanding tenor with stage presence and a powerful voice (unfortunately this does not often go together with the lyricism that one expects from a tenor, the volume plays in a dangerous way between the higher and lower registers, but being this the case of the Verdi type of tenor in which the vocal treatment does not follow the simple principle of bel canto but it deepens until becoming a true portrait of the soul, Manzitti perfectly renders his performance).

By Alejandro César Villarreal / Hágase la música / July, 2011

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Gustavo López Manzitti ratified his background as a subtle musician and his efficiency throughout his vocal register with absolute solvency from the beginning to the end of the score. Furthermore he was the only lead singer who devoted himself to the creation of a character. It’s unbelievable how much he has improved as an actor, from those beginnings when this was the weak point in his performancess. Manzitti sings with finesse, has a very good phrasing, skillfully uses mezza voce and transmits a feeling of confidence in what he’s doing. He excels in the counterscenes, managing to convey the feeling of being listening to the other character’s words as if it were the first time, being astonished at times, instead of showing that he is well aware of what they are going to say because he’s heard it in the rehearsals.

By Luis Baietti / Opera y Ballet / July 20, 2011

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Gustavo Lopez Manzitti is equally impressive as Aida’s love, Radames, commander of the Egyptian army. His voice is unusually rich and full for a tenor, ably conveying Radames’ passions.

By Lucia Anderson / the Freelance Star / October 20, 2011

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Opera Delaware’s production of Giacomo Puccini’s Tosca is the best I have seen from the organization since OD’s1960s interpretation of Mozart’s Don Giovanni.
Gustavo López Manzitti’s passionate portrayal of Mario Cavaradossi is intense – his daredevil high tenor notes and focused acting made for a spellbinding character. His Recondita armonia, extolling the mysteries of Floria Tosca and why he finds her beautiful was almost as gripping as his hauntingly sad E lucevan le stelle – accompanied cautiously by clarinetist Marianne Gythfeldt.

By Margaret Darby / Delaware Arts Info / March 5, 2010

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The Turiddu of Argentinian tenor Gustavo Lopez Manzitti was a notable one. From the offstage serenade sung to Alfio’s wife “O Lola,” to his ardent duet with Santuzza, his sturdy fearless voice rang out. Lopez Manzitti’s drinking song “Viva il vino spumeggiante” with Lola and full chorus was exuberant. Lopez Manzitti’s impassioned farewell to his mother (Lucia) “Mamma, quel vino e generoso” was sung with blazing intensity.
Gustavo Lopez Manzitti’s Canio was as good as it gets. Manzitti’s “Vesti la giubba” was sung with pathos, passion and power and his cries of “Infamia” are etched in my heart. His singing of “No Pagliaccio non son” was sung with rageful abandon… His cries of “E il nome” demanding to know Nedda’s lover’s name, had us at the edge of our seats. The final words in the opera “La commedia e finata!” shouted to the audience by Canio, as he drops the knife with which he killed Nedda and her lover Silvio were riveting.

By Nino Pantano / Opera List / February 15, 2010

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A great tenor
Brilliant was the performance of tenor Gustavo Lopez Manzitti as the Doge’s son, who, once again in his wonderful career, brought his resources and the care with which he analyzes the character, not only to build it in a believable way from the dramatic point of view, but also looking for an expressiveness that won’t betray the credibility of the dramatic action. This naturalness was achieved by the ductile and noble artist.

By Juan Carlos Montero / La Nacion / January 12, 2009

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